Tag Archives: iphone

The A-Z of Location Based Marketing

 

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26 key elements inside this wide and complex channel that you probably need to be aware of. A  mixture of trends, platforms, strategy and more, avoiding simply listing the main players in the market that everyone knows about.

 

A … is for Apps

Apps are important and have proved to be a game-changer for geomarketing. 29% of mobile owners use location based apps on their phones more than once a day and 27% use them multiple times on a weekly basis. This is expected to dramatically increase in the future.

B … is for Businesses

Get your business online! Google Places should already be a staple part of of any SME/SMB company’s online marketing presence. Even enterprises with localised offline stores can jump on board to reach out to a local audience.

C … is for Campaign

Location-based marketing can take many forms so you need to think about your objective and then build a strategy around this. Will a quick PR campaign achieve your goals, or would you be better off finding a more long-term approach?

D … is for Directory

Getting listed in local directories is being overlooked a lot at the moment, in favour of more sexy kinds of geomarketing.

I still think there’s enormous value (especially for smaller businesses) in getting onboard with niche sites such as Yelp or TopTable. It’ll also help improve search visibility, which is an important factor, considering that more than 20% of search queries have a localised intent.

E  … is for Engagement

If you’re going to have a geo-based mobile application, you have to make it engaging for your audience. If not, it probably won’t work, especially when you consider that it has to compete with millions of other apps to stand out.

It’s generally the same for any wider campaign: if it doesn’t get people wanting to be involved, you’re likely not to meet your objectives.

F … is for Foursquare

I said I wouldn’t mention too many location-based services, but to ignore Foursquare would be silly. The platform has seen great uptake amongst users and brands have been quick to wade in.

There are a lot of great case studies of smart, creative campaigns floating around.

G … is for Gowalla

G was pretty hard, so I had to use this one. Gowalla is pretty similar to Foursquare: It’s a location-based social network that users can connect to and check-in based on their physical location.

In return virtual rewards are collected, which can then be redeemed for real-life rewards like cinema tickets.

H … is for Hotpot

Google is seriously throwing itself into localised content and search results. Hotpot is a new UGC local recommendation engine, Here’s a good explanation as to how this works.

It still seems to be developing, but may well gather momentum in the near future.

I … is for Information

A lot of users are looking for information from local businesses: where a store is based, opening times and more. Don’t withhold this from them!

Ensure that they have access to as much information about your company as possible across as many touchpoints you can manage.

J … is for JiWire

JiWire is a smart location-based advertising company, which uses free wifi hotspots to serve up relevant display ads.

It’s quite a new company, but an innovative approach means that it is blazing a trail across location-based marketing.

K … is for Knowledge

Before embarking on any form of geomarketing, you need to arm yourself with knowledge to help you understand your goals – at marketing and business levels – and to plan around these.

Who are your main audience? What are their behaviours? What do you want them to do? The questions that need to be asked will go on for a long time, but once you full know what the answers are, the rest should fall into place.

L … is for Latitude

Google Latitude is a location-aware mobile app. It allows the user to share their location on Google Maps with selected people to whatever degree they want: eg. Street, city or country levels.

It can be turned on and off at will, so gives a large amount of control. While this on its own is arguably nothing special, it has an open API that marketers can take advantage of.

M … is for Mobile

Without a doubt, mobile handsets are changing the location-based marketing game. The flexibility and potential now offered by smartphones means that the only real limit is creativity. (And budget).

N … is for Nice-to-have

You need to question whether having some geomarketing capabilities are essential or just nice-to-have.

What’s more important: allocating resources to ensure that your chain of offline stores can be found in the results of user’s local search queries, or setting up a Foursquare campaign?

O … is for Objective

What do you want from your location-based activities? Branding? Increased awareness? Sales? Leads? Once you understand this, figuring out the best strategy to achieve it should be pretty easy.

P … is for Places

What kind of list would this be without mentioning Facebook Places? Places lets users check-in to Facebook using a mobile device and share their location with their social networks.

Recent developments have seen partnership deals with the likes of Starbucks, Debenhams, O2 and Yo!Sushi.

Q … is for Question

As already mentioned, you need to question not only what you want from any location-based marketing, but also what your users want.

With the best will in the world, without understanding your main demographic, planning and execution of a campaign or programme can still go horribly wrong if not realised properly.

R … is for Rewards

It’s no secret that users love rewards and marketers are using this more and more. The likes of Facebook, Foursquare and Gowalla have all formed partnership deals with companies to reward users with physical products, based on ideas surrounding location loyalty.

S … is for Search

Two words here, really: Local search. You need to make sure you’re on it, for all the obvious reasons.

T  … is for Twitter

Twitter recently launched Twitter Places, which is the functionality to show the location of users as part of an opt-in process. If a user chooses this option, then all their Tweets are subsequently attached to publicly shared information about their exact location.

U … is for User experience

In the same sense as “Engaging”, geomarketing has to deliver a great user experience, particularly if it’s part of a campaign. Without good UX, users will quickly stop participating.

V … is for Voucher

As with rewards, vouchers are growing to become a large part of geomarketing. The clever chaps at Vouchercode show how this is best done.

W … is for WiFi

As wifi becomes increasingly free, it’s getting easier for users to share their location with their networks and to engage with geo-driven campaigns and marketing. Arguably, this has been a big driver of the increase of LBM, alongside smartphone handsets.

X  … is for X-marks the spot

Make sure your location is right! There’s nothing more frustrating for a user than to discover you’ve moved, but haven’t changed the details on search-based maps, for example…

Y  … is for Y-gen

Just something to keep in mind, but statistically, Generation-Y is more likely to share their location and engage with geomarketing.

Z … is for Zzzz

Location-based marketing has been around for a while, but it’s definitely here to stay, helped along by the user uptake of social media and mobile. If you snooze, you’ll lose.

Source: http://econsultancy.com/uk/blog/7292-the-a-z-of-location-based-marketing?utm_medium=email&utm_source=newsletter


Who owns the paying mobile consumer: carriers or handset-makers?

Handset manufactuers, carriers and payment franchises: Who has the power?

The battle between Research In Motion and wireless carriers over mobile-payment data is a precursor to a larger war over who owns consumers making transactions using mobile devices.

United States carriers assumed continued ownership of their subscribers with the announcement of Isis, their bid to create a standard for enabling contactless payments and marketing at retailers’ point of sale via Near Field Communication. Now RIM and other handset manufacturers are exploring alternatives to that model, and the equation gets even more complicated when factoring in payment franchises such as Visa, MasterCard and American Express.

“Technically, RIM and Apple cannot preclude the SIM card solution proposed by the U.S. carriers through the Isis joint venture, and the carriers can’t preclude RIM from developing a mobile OS solution,” said David Schropfer, author of “The Smartphone Wallet,” Red Bank, NJ.

“From a consumer perspective, a smartphone connected to a mobile network will have more features—like loyalty program integration), and offer a higher degree of control for the consumer, than an application that relies on the NFC connection to the retailer during a transaction,” he said.

“The biggest question is whether or not the consumer will have access to those products in the future, or if efforts to bring these products to market will be derailed by the incumbents.”

Who will brand the mobile wallet?
The gist of the debate between BlackBerry-maker RIM and the carriers is whether data related to mobile payments will sit on wireless devices’ SIM cards, thus keeping the control with the carriers, or whether the handset-makers can build payment credentials directly into handsets, potentially doing an end-run around the carriers.

The argument boils down to who owns the customers using a mobile wallet and who gets a cut of the revenue—and how much of a cut.

RIM and other handset manufacturers would prefer to partner with financial institutions directly.

BlackBerry devices set to launch later this year will reportedly have NFC chips embedded in them, as does Google’s Nexus S Android smartphone.

Speculation has been rampant as to whether or not Apple will support NFC with the release of the iPhone 5.
The assumption was that when NFC was brought to market, carriers would control the SIM cards, a single-wire protocol with an NFC antenna directly connected to the secure elements in the device, per Yankee Group.

“That was the traditional model—the assumption was that with NFC, the final say of which credentials go onto the mobile phone would be controlled by the carriers, which is why they thought they could shut out Visa and MasterCard with Isis,” said Nick Holland, senior analyst at Yankee Group, Boston.

Inside Secure is an example of a company that sells chipsets that allow operating systems on mobile devices to access not just one secure element, but many.

Mr. Holland said that it does not have to be just the SIM now that is dictated by the wireless carrier—there can be an additional secure element on top of the SIM that companies such as Gemalto supply.

The key takeaway: Whoever owns the secure element, owns the transactions.

“Maybe six months ago the only option for Visa or MasterCard would have been an NFC sticker, but now they have the potential to completely bypass the carriers by partnering with the OEMs or creating an SD Microcard they put out themselves,” Mr. Holland said. “RIM is doing this, and I would expect others to follow suit.

“Carriers want the potential for everybody to access the secure element, but it is going to be messy, especially in the U.S., where the carriers pretty much dictate which handsets are on their networks,” he said. “Is AT&T going to say, ‘no, I’m not going to stock the new iPhone, thank you very much’?

The real value proposition for NFC is it being really simple to use, and if there are multiple secure elements on a device, that is adding additional dimensions of complexity for consumers.

This fight is over who owns the secure element, which could somewhat disrupt the usability of these handsets, per Yankee Group.

Mr. Holland believes that there will be less of a monopoly in terms of who owns the secure element going forward. That will lead to competition for carrier initiatives such as Isis.

“Isis has a real problem on its hands now,” Mr. Holldand said. “The carriers assumed that they would own the handsets and the SIM, and therefore said ‘We will own the transaction and we can shut out Visa and MasterCard.’

“However, if you are Visa, you probably don’t want to put out an SD Microcard on your own—it would be much easier to rent space on the SIM,” he said. “Isis may have to play nice and let Visa and MasterCard rent space on the SIM and process transactions.

“This is going to be really hotly fought over.”

Source: Mobile Commerce Daily http://www.mobilecommercedaily.com


Steve Jobs’ New Year’s resolutions found on Starbucks napkin

Palo Alto, CA — Uh-oh. Another piece of top-secret Apple material has been left behind in a public place. Only this time the culprit is Steve Jobs himself.

A napkin bearing Steve’s hand-scrawled New Year’s resolutions was picked up by an astute patron in a Palo Alto Starbucks after the Apple CEO rushed out to take a call.

After a brief bidding war with Gizmodo, Scoopertino has taken possession of the napkin and proudly presents this teardown:

The napkin is standard-issue Starbucks beige. Written in what appears to be a thin Sharpie, black, are ten numbered resolutions. It cannot be determined if they are in ascending or descending order of importance. Three mug stains appear to be random.

Some of Steve’s resolutions are shocking and/or surprising, while others suggest a playful CEO who enjoys pranking the likes of Mark Zuckerberg — and fleeing the likes of Steve Wozniak.

Resolution #1 — Keep the Verizon myth going — will likely rock Wall Street today. Resolution #5 — Reject more apps, just for fun — shows a CEO who delights in his work. Resolution #9 may have even the most fervent Apple fans questioning their faith — Upgrade to iPhone 4 when antenna gets fixed.

Apple’s PR department declined to respond, saying they do not comment on unreleased resolutions.


Has Apple just screwed the business model for selling software?

Last week, Apple launched an app store for Macs.

This marks the beginning of the end traditional software business.

Mac AppStore

Apple has already show a new way of selling software using the three-way integration between the iPhone, the App Store and iTunes. From a business perspective, the most important aspect of this integration is not the seamless purchase path and the high conversion rates; it’s the way it has reduced distribution costs to close-to-zero.

When distribution is free

Software, like most content, is expensive to create. It requires skilled engineers, programmers and product managers to get right. However, like most content, it is inexpensive to distribute.

Actually, what I mean is that it used to be expensive to distribute’; now it’s cheap. The old model involved boxes and shiny discs and glossy packaging. The new model involves digital download. Making one more copy of a piece of software is incredibly cheap. So cheap as to be almost free.

What happened on the iPhone when distribution was free

if you put a product up on the iPhone App Store, distribution is free. The bandwidth costs are swallowed by Apple as a cross promotional tool to sell its hardware. If you give away a free app, and never make any money from it, Apple doesn’t charge you anything. If you make money from it, Apple charges you 30%.

This truth – that distribution is effectively free – has seen a rapid change of business models on the iPhone. Initially, games launched at a price point to compete with PSP and DS titles. By December 2008, the average price of an iPhone app had fallen to $1.58. Before long, the Freemium model emerged and now 34 of the top 100 grossing apps are free, with revenues generated from In App Purchases.

Expectations are changing

it was easy to charge for software when it came in a box and had associated physical costs. No, scratch that. It was essential to charge for software when the marginal cost of distribution was meaningful. To put that another way, if it cost you real money to make one more copy, which it does with a physical copy, you need to charge real money for a copy.

This is not true in the digital era. However, many business models have not evolved to reflect this. (Obviously the software-as-a-service model is an evolution in this direction.)

The Mac Appstore brings smartphone style pricing to the desktop. Smart SaaS companies will look at ways of making their software available for free via the distribution mechanism of the App Store, and using their existing upsell expertise to generate revenues. Startups who can’t afford the marketing budgets to compete with incumbent software business will launch freemium products via the appstore (like Zynga and Playfish did on Facebook; like ngMoco and Nimblebits on iPhone). Companies who only know how to sell premium priced products as software downloads are in trouble.

The Mac App Store is the deathknell for selling software in boxes. When it comes to the PC (and there is about to be a bun fight for the position as the desktop App Store), it will start driving prices down to zero.

Watch the smart phone arena closely. That’s what the desktop market will look like in 2 to 3 years.