Tag Archives: google places

Google Wins Mobile Payments Race With Summer Launch Of ‘Wallet’ App

Well I guess you could say if Google is gonna get into this space, then all with be looking and wanting to follow.

A couple of interesting things I see in this space unfolding – one around the opportunity for targeted, relevant advertising ( with a bit of social location thrown in for good measure) and the second for a robust solution that tackles the area of fraud. Maybe device fingerprinting from a company such as Bluecava could provide a solution that tackles both these areas. Let’s see….

The race to make mobile payments mainstream is one of the most competitive contests in the wireless industry, pitting telecom operators against credit card companies, payment processors, handset makers and operating system providers. With its May 26 announcement that it is poised to launch a national mobile commerce network (using its Android phones), Google now appears to be in the lead.

The service, called Google Wallet, will store credit cards in electronic form on Android phones. Users will be able to pay for purchases by wirelessly “tapping” their handsets against special readers in participating stores. Users can also receive targeted offers, such as coupons for products they have bought in the past or have indicated they like, directly on their phones while in stores. Loyalty rewards will be automatically tallied within Wallet and receipts will be electronic, as well, popping up on the phone instead of printing out on paper.

Merchants have already started testing the setup and will begin trials in San Francisco and New York City before expanding nationally this summer. American Eagle, the Container Store, Macy’s, Subway, Toys “R” Us and Walgreens are part of the initial group of retailers that will support the system.

As the name Wallet suggests, the app will support a variety of different cards, including credit cards, loyalty cards and gift cards. At first, Google Wallet will only work with Citi MasterCards, since both companies are Google Wallet launch partners. Users can also opt to load money onto a prepaid, Google-hosted card that can be funded by another type of credit card. Google says it will add more cards over time and hopes to eventually include other types of ID and passes, such as drivers licenses, event tickets and electronic hotel keys.

Retailers, says Google, will benefit from a corresponding service called Google Offers that will enable consumers to search for special offers and save them to their Google Wallet. Those stored coupons can then be redeemed by tapping a Wallet-equipped phone at a cash register or showing the phone screen to a cashier.

Merchants will be able to customize incentives based on a customer’s location and transaction history. A particularly frequent customer can receive a higher-value deal than a less loyal customer, for instance. Google Offers will go live in Portland, San Francisco and New York City this summer.

Google also plans to support location-based “check-in” offers, offers that are placed like ads in Google searches and offers that are situated in Google’s local business/maps service, Google Places.

Using a cellphone as a wallet is convenient but could be risky. Google says its Wallet app contains multiple levels of security, including a phone screen lock and a required Google account and pin number. The search giant also says credit cards are encrypted on a secure element within the phone and never fully displayed.

Part of the security comes from a chip developed by European semiconductor maker NXP, which collaborated with Google on its latest flagship smartphone, the Samsung-made Nexus S. That chip also enables Google Wallet to communicate wirelessly with all the various Wallet partners, via a technology called NFC (near-field communication).

Google’s vision appears similar to strategies espoused by organizations like ISIS, the mobile commerce startup backed by AT&T, T-Mobile USA and Verizon Wireless. New York-based ISIS is about a year behind Google, though it may have an advantage in being compatible with a greater variety of phones once it launches.

During Google’s Thursday New York event, its Vice President of Payments, Osama Bedier, argued that Google is “uniquely positioned” to roll out a mobile commerce program because of its wide-ranging partnerships forged through Android and its search and advertising businesses. Bedier, who was a top executive at eBay’s PayPal until January, noted, “This has to be an ecosystem; it can’t just be one company.”

Bedier also acknowledged Google’s lead in the mobile payments race by adding, “This is not just an idea or announcement…this is up and running.”

Source: http://blogs.forbes.com/elizabethwoyke/2011/05/26/google-wins-mobile-payments-race-with-summer-launch-of-wallet-app/


The A-Z of Location Based Marketing

 

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26 key elements inside this wide and complex channel that you probably need to be aware of. A  mixture of trends, platforms, strategy and more, avoiding simply listing the main players in the market that everyone knows about.

 

A … is for Apps

Apps are important and have proved to be a game-changer for geomarketing. 29% of mobile owners use location based apps on their phones more than once a day and 27% use them multiple times on a weekly basis. This is expected to dramatically increase in the future.

B … is for Businesses

Get your business online! Google Places should already be a staple part of of any SME/SMB company’s online marketing presence. Even enterprises with localised offline stores can jump on board to reach out to a local audience.

C … is for Campaign

Location-based marketing can take many forms so you need to think about your objective and then build a strategy around this. Will a quick PR campaign achieve your goals, or would you be better off finding a more long-term approach?

D … is for Directory

Getting listed in local directories is being overlooked a lot at the moment, in favour of more sexy kinds of geomarketing.

I still think there’s enormous value (especially for smaller businesses) in getting onboard with niche sites such as Yelp or TopTable. It’ll also help improve search visibility, which is an important factor, considering that more than 20% of search queries have a localised intent.

E  … is for Engagement

If you’re going to have a geo-based mobile application, you have to make it engaging for your audience. If not, it probably won’t work, especially when you consider that it has to compete with millions of other apps to stand out.

It’s generally the same for any wider campaign: if it doesn’t get people wanting to be involved, you’re likely not to meet your objectives.

F … is for Foursquare

I said I wouldn’t mention too many location-based services, but to ignore Foursquare would be silly. The platform has seen great uptake amongst users and brands have been quick to wade in.

There are a lot of great case studies of smart, creative campaigns floating around.

G … is for Gowalla

G was pretty hard, so I had to use this one. Gowalla is pretty similar to Foursquare: It’s a location-based social network that users can connect to and check-in based on their physical location.

In return virtual rewards are collected, which can then be redeemed for real-life rewards like cinema tickets.

H … is for Hotpot

Google is seriously throwing itself into localised content and search results. Hotpot is a new UGC local recommendation engine, Here’s a good explanation as to how this works.

It still seems to be developing, but may well gather momentum in the near future.

I … is for Information

A lot of users are looking for information from local businesses: where a store is based, opening times and more. Don’t withhold this from them!

Ensure that they have access to as much information about your company as possible across as many touchpoints you can manage.

J … is for JiWire

JiWire is a smart location-based advertising company, which uses free wifi hotspots to serve up relevant display ads.

It’s quite a new company, but an innovative approach means that it is blazing a trail across location-based marketing.

K … is for Knowledge

Before embarking on any form of geomarketing, you need to arm yourself with knowledge to help you understand your goals – at marketing and business levels – and to plan around these.

Who are your main audience? What are their behaviours? What do you want them to do? The questions that need to be asked will go on for a long time, but once you full know what the answers are, the rest should fall into place.

L … is for Latitude

Google Latitude is a location-aware mobile app. It allows the user to share their location on Google Maps with selected people to whatever degree they want: eg. Street, city or country levels.

It can be turned on and off at will, so gives a large amount of control. While this on its own is arguably nothing special, it has an open API that marketers can take advantage of.

M … is for Mobile

Without a doubt, mobile handsets are changing the location-based marketing game. The flexibility and potential now offered by smartphones means that the only real limit is creativity. (And budget).

N … is for Nice-to-have

You need to question whether having some geomarketing capabilities are essential or just nice-to-have.

What’s more important: allocating resources to ensure that your chain of offline stores can be found in the results of user’s local search queries, or setting up a Foursquare campaign?

O … is for Objective

What do you want from your location-based activities? Branding? Increased awareness? Sales? Leads? Once you understand this, figuring out the best strategy to achieve it should be pretty easy.

P … is for Places

What kind of list would this be without mentioning Facebook Places? Places lets users check-in to Facebook using a mobile device and share their location with their social networks.

Recent developments have seen partnership deals with the likes of Starbucks, Debenhams, O2 and Yo!Sushi.

Q … is for Question

As already mentioned, you need to question not only what you want from any location-based marketing, but also what your users want.

With the best will in the world, without understanding your main demographic, planning and execution of a campaign or programme can still go horribly wrong if not realised properly.

R … is for Rewards

It’s no secret that users love rewards and marketers are using this more and more. The likes of Facebook, Foursquare and Gowalla have all formed partnership deals with companies to reward users with physical products, based on ideas surrounding location loyalty.

S … is for Search

Two words here, really: Local search. You need to make sure you’re on it, for all the obvious reasons.

T  … is for Twitter

Twitter recently launched Twitter Places, which is the functionality to show the location of users as part of an opt-in process. If a user chooses this option, then all their Tweets are subsequently attached to publicly shared information about their exact location.

U … is for User experience

In the same sense as “Engaging”, geomarketing has to deliver a great user experience, particularly if it’s part of a campaign. Without good UX, users will quickly stop participating.

V … is for Voucher

As with rewards, vouchers are growing to become a large part of geomarketing. The clever chaps at Vouchercode show how this is best done.

W … is for WiFi

As wifi becomes increasingly free, it’s getting easier for users to share their location with their networks and to engage with geo-driven campaigns and marketing. Arguably, this has been a big driver of the increase of LBM, alongside smartphone handsets.

X  … is for X-marks the spot

Make sure your location is right! There’s nothing more frustrating for a user than to discover you’ve moved, but haven’t changed the details on search-based maps, for example…

Y  … is for Y-gen

Just something to keep in mind, but statistically, Generation-Y is more likely to share their location and engage with geomarketing.

Z … is for Zzzz

Location-based marketing has been around for a while, but it’s definitely here to stay, helped along by the user uptake of social media and mobile. If you snooze, you’ll lose.

Source: http://econsultancy.com/uk/blog/7292-the-a-z-of-location-based-marketing?utm_medium=email&utm_source=newsletter