Tag Archives: farmville

Can Social Gaming Revive The Music Industry?

Music Industry has often been criticized for failing to come up with a viable business plan to tap the internet market. Piracy and sharing have made matters worse as people tend to assume that everything that’s on the internet is free to be shared. With flurry of peer-to-peer sites and torrents, it seemed things could only get worse for the industry.

3611739526 88edbdb76d m Can Social Gaming Revive The Music Industry?

But there is a silver lining in waiting and it could come in the form of Social gaming. In its first of a kind collaboration, Zynga has partnered with Lady Gaga to launch GagaVille. The game is up an live today. The game gives “little monsters” throughout the world a first listen to exclusive un-released songs from the upcoming when they visit GagaVille, a uniquely designed neighboring farm in FarmVille. The full album also comes bundled as a free download with the purchase of a special Zynga $25 game card, available exclusively at Best Buy.

What impresses me is how beautifully Zynga has placed ads into its most popular game. Gamers are not annoyed by traditional ad formats like pop-ups and at the same time are engaged with the product of the advertisers.

Its a win-win situation for Zynga and Gaga, Zynga benefits by increasing stickiness to its games and earning profits from game cards while Gaga gets a huge publicity for herself and her new album. It could be a new revenue model for both artists and gaming studios which could set a precedent of things to come. Lady Gaga has been attributed forreviving the music industry in 2010. As Grape Juice states, “Similar to a young Madonna, GaGa has used innovative music videos to her stunning stage shows to separate herself from her contemporaries, capturing public interest in a way that no other act has managed in years”.

Gaga has again differentiated herself from others by engaging with a gaming studio. Will she be second time lucky?

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Zynga Preps The Launch Of RewardVille: Earn Rewards For Playing Games

It’s interesting to see how these guys are looking at every possible angle to get you to spend…and also there plans for taking this stuff onto mobile.

Zynga is preparing to launch RewardVille. No, it’s not another ‘Ville’ game, but a custom rewards program apparently designed to let users earn rewards for playing Zynga games – which you can then use earn virtual currency, which you then use for purchasing in-game items.

Ok, let’s take a step back.

Earlier this month, domain industry vet and blogger Elliot J. Silver wondered whether it was Zynga who acquired the domain name RewardVille.com from its previous owner, for $4,500.

Fusible.com then pretty much confirmed Zynga made the purchase, by uncovering that the social gaming juggernaut had registered a European trademark for ‘Rewardville’ last month.

Fast forward to today, and Rewardville.com now resolves to a website that announces the rewards program in beta – the same website appears when you visit rewards.zynga.com, by the way. There’s a login screen, but you need to have a Zynga account (which, as far as I know, is usually created by connecting to your Facebook account) to get in.

There’s more.

If you look at the menu at the bottom, you’ll see a link to a now deleted FAQ item about RewardVille, which is set to launch in the next few weeks, as you can tell from the screenshot above.

I did some digging, though, and found a blogger that cleverly took screenshots of several pages Zynga put up about RewardVille, which all return errors at this point however.

The screenshot of the overview page is the most revealing:

It reads:

“RewardVille is a new rewards program which lets players earn rewards for Zynga games! Each time you play a participating Zynga game, you’ll earn Zynga Points (zPoints) and increase your Zynga Level (zLevel). At every zLevel, you’ll earn Zynga Coins (zCoins) to use on free, exclusive in-game items in RewardVille!”

I sincerely zHope that was as zConfusing for zYou as it was for zMe.

Participating games include FarmVille, FrontierVille, Mafia Wars, Treasure Isle and Zynga Poker (and not hit game CityVille), although Zynga says they’ll activate zPoints on other games in the future.

On another – now removed – page, Zynga specified that users automatically earn zPoints for playing Zynga games, and will need to register for a Zynga account in order to redeem zCoins. Users will be eligible to earn a maximum of 80 points per game per day, with a maximum of 300 points across the entire Zynga network each day.

We’ve reached out to Zynga for more information, but didn’t hear back immediately.

Zynga image
Website: zynga.com
Location: San Francisco, California, United States
Founded: July, 2007
Funding: $519M

Zynga was founded in July 2007 by Mark Pincus and is named for his late American Bulldog, Zinga. Loyal and spirited, Zinga’s name is a nod to a legendary African warrior queen. The early supporting founding team included Eric Schiermeyer, Michael… Learn More


DICE 2010 – Design Outside The Box

A great video for those into online entertainment courtesy of Jesse Schell…but also what is next in terms of social gaming

http://g4tv.com/lv3/44277


Social Gaming Market to Surpass $1 Billion in 2011 – Revenues up 27.7% this year

The rapid rise in popularity of social networking sites as a venue for casual gaming since Zynga released FarmVille in June 2009 will make social gaming a billion-dollar business this year, eMarketer estimates.

Nearly 62 million US internet users, or 27% of the online audience, will play at least one game on a social network monthly this year, up from 53 million in 2010. Their numbers will continue to grow and, along with them, money spent on virtual goods, lead-generation offers and advertising.

“Forecasts of audience and revenue growth present an opportunity for marketers to promote their brands through social games,” said Paul Verna, author of the forthcoming eMarketer report “Social Gaming: Marketers Make Their Moves.” “Implementations include branded virtual goods, custom games, virtual environments within existing games and lead-generation offers. Some campaigns even combine virtual and real-world items, expanding the gaming experience beyond social networks like Facebook and Myspace.”

Revenues from virtual goods made up the majority of social gaming revenues in the past, and they will continue to bring in the biggest share of dollars through 2012. Ad spending will grow more quickly; in 2011, marketers will spend $192 million to advertise on social games, nearly a 60% increase over 2010. eMarketer forecasts a further rise of 41% in ad spending next year.

US Social Gaming Revenues, by Segment, 2010-2012 (millions)

Rapid growth in ad spending will help its share of total revenues grow from 14.1% in 2010 to 20.5% in 2012, when it will surpass lead-generation offers as a source of developer revenues. Such offers have been a powerful force in the social gaming market but are losing favor as marketers use games for more branding-oriented efforts. Virtual goods will hold steadily onto a share of about 60% of the market.

US Social Gaming Revenue Share, by Segment, 2010 & 2012 (% of total)

“Even though fewer than 6% of US social gamers spend money on virtual items, these avid players will produce revenues of $653 million in the US alone this year,” Verna said. “This is the largest segment of the social gaming economy, and one that marketers are increasingly turning to as a branding vehicle. We expect to see more branded virtual goods as social gaming matures over the next two years.”